Effects of supplementing broiler diets with Saccharomyces cerevisiae at different levels and frozen storage on the meat quality traits of breasts and drumsticks


AKSU M. İ., KARAOĞLU M. M., ESENBUĞA N., MACİT M., Er H. O.

EUROPEAN POULTRY SCIENCE, vol.78, 2014 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 78
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Doi Number: 10.1399/eps.2014.33
  • Journal Name: EUROPEAN POULTRY SCIENCE
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Eskisehir Osmangazi University Affiliated: No

Abstract

The effects of diets supplemented with probiotics at different levels and of frozen storage on lipid oxidation, microbial counts, pH and colour in broiler breast and drumstick meats were studied. Chickens were fed with diets containing different levels of probiotic (P-0 0.0%, P-1 0.1% and P-2 0.2%; containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae (4x10(8) cfu g(-1))) until 49 days of age. The carcasses were stored at 3 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 24 h after slaughtering and eviscerating. After standard dissection of the carcasses, breast fillets and drumstick were aerobically packaged, frozen, stored at -18 degrees C for 150 days and analyzed after 0, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 150 days of frozen storage. Oxidation levels decreased (P < 0.01) for both breast and drumstick samples from probiotic treatments in comparison to the control group during frozen storage. In general, lipid oxidation in samples increased (P < 0.01) during frozen storage. The type of meat had a significant effect on lipid oxidation (P < 0.01). The level of probiotics in diet, type of meat and storage time had significant effects on total aerobic mesophilic, lactic acid bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae and pH values of breast and drumstick meat. Psychrotrophic bacteria counts were only affected by storage time (p < 0.01). The L* and a* values were not changed by the dietary treatments (p > 0.05), while b* value was affected (p < 0.05). The b* value of samples from the treatment with 0.2% probiotic was significantly higher than that of broilers fed the diet with 0.1% probiotic (P < 0.05). The type of meat had a significant effect on L*, a* and b* values (P < 0.05), while frozen storage time affected a* and b* values (P < 0.05).