The Ottoman and the Russian Empires after the Death of Catherine II: A Thaw in Relations, 1797-1798


Morkva V.

ESKISEHIR OSMANGAZI UNIVERSITESI IIBF DERGISI-ESKISEHIR OSMANGAZI UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES, vol.11, no.1, pp.273-283, 2016 (Journal Indexed in ESCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 11 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Title of Journal : ESKISEHIR OSMANGAZI UNIVERSITESI IIBF DERGISI-ESKISEHIR OSMANGAZI UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF ECONOMICS AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES
  • Page Numbers: pp.273-283

Abstract

Following the death of Catherine II and ascent of Paul I to the throne, the nature of the Ottoman-Russian relations distinctly changed: the previous tensions reduced and risk of the new war diminished. At the same time, the victorious advance of the French armies in Europe, along with the French annexation of the Ionian Archipelago, raised the reasonable security concerns on the part of the Ottoman government. Amid the rising French power and the domestic conflict with Osman Pazvantoglu, the perception of the immediate Russian threat began to wane at the Porte. The new Russian Emperor consistently made it clear that he was not going to engage into risky projects of his mother, whereas for the Ottoman government the war with Russia was as well out of the question.