Global warming and allergy in Asia Minor


Bajin M. D. , CİNGİ C. , Oghan F., GÜRBÜZ M. K.

EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY, vol.270, no.1, pp.27-31, 2013 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Review
  • Volume: 270 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s00405-012-2073-9
  • Title of Journal : EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY
  • Page Numbers: pp.27-31

Abstract

The earth is warming, and it is warming quickly. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that global warming is correlated with the frequency of pollen-induced respiratory allergy and allergic diseases. There is a body of evidence suggesting that the prevalence of allergic diseases induced by pollens is increasing in developed countries, a trend that is also evident in the Mediterranean area. Because of its mild winters and sunny days with dry summers, the Mediterranean area is different from the areas of central and northern Europe. Classical examples of allergenic pollen-producing plants of the Mediterranean climate include Parietaria, Olea and Cupressaceae. Asia Minor is a Mediterranean region that connects Asia and Europe, and it includes considerable coastal areas. Gramineae pollens are the major cause of seasonal allergic rhinitis in Asia Minor, affecting 1.3-6.4 % of the population, in accordance with other European regions. This article emphasizes the importance of global climate change and anticipated increases in the prevalence and severity of allergic disease in Asia Minor, mediated through worsening air pollution and altered local and regional pollen production, from an otolaryngologic perspective.